Approaches for the Improvement of the Economic Sustainability of Natural Forest Management in the Tropics - including REDD+ Mechanism

Published by Institute for World Forestry/Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute (Editors)

Michael Köhl, Thomas Schneider, Prem Neupane, Jutta Lax, Jutta Poker

Kurzübersicht

The need to protect tropical and sub-tropical forests from degradation and deforestation finds wide, societal agreement. In the past, miscellaneous initiatives were launched to protect tropical natural forests from depletion. Among those initiatives are the definition of standards for sustainable forest management (SFM), certification, boycott of tropical timber, forest law enforcement, or abatement of illegal logging. Despite these initiatives, the global forest area decreased by almost 400 million hectares from 1948 to 2010. According to FAO, 5.1 million hectares (or 51100 km2) of forest were lost annually in the period from 2000 to 2010, most of which are located in the tropics. Deforestation and forest degradation occur as a result of direct or proximate causes (e.g., human activities and actions) which are generally underpinned by several other indirect or underlying causes. The indirect causes are produced through complex interactions among social, economic, institutional, political, and technological processes.
ISBN: 978-3-944101-16-3
Veröffentlicht: 21.12.2014, 1.. Auflage, Einband: Broschur, Abbildung und Tabellen: zahlr., farbig, Seiten 352, Format 148x210 mm (DIN A5), Gewicht 0.5 kg
Lieferzeit: 2-3 Tage
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49,80 €

Approaches for the Improvement of the Economic Sustainability of Natural Forest Management in the Tropics

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Institute for World Forestry/Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute (Editor)

Approaches for the Improvement of the Economic Sustainability of Natural Forest Management in the Tropics - including REDD+ Mechanism

352 Seiten, DIN A 5, kartoniert, mit zahlr. Abb. und Tab., durchgehend farbig. ISBN 978-3-944101-16-3
Preis: 49,00 Euro. Rhombos-Verlag, Berlin 2014
Band 56 der Reihe IÖR-Schriften

Leading authors

Professor Dr. Michael Köhl, University of Hamburg
Dr. Thomas Schneider, Institute for World Forestry
Prem Neupane, University of Hamburg
Jutta Lax, Institute for World Forestry
Jutta Poker, Institute for World Forestry


Description

he need to protect tropical and sub-tropical forests from degradation and deforestation finds wide, societal agreement. In the past, miscellaneous initiatives were launched to protect tropical natural  forests from depletion. Among those initiatives are the definition of standards for sustainable forest management (SFM), certification, boycott of tropical timber, forest law enforcement, or abatement of illegal logging. Despite these initiatives, the global forest area decreased by almost 400 million hectares from 1948 to 2010. According to FAO, 5.1 million hectares (or 51100 km2) of forest were lost annually in the period from 2000 to 2010, most of which are located in the tropics. Deforestation and forest degradation occur as a result of direct or proximate causes (e.g., human activities and actions) which are generally underpinned by several other indirect or underlying causes. The indirect causes are produced through complex interactions among social, economic, institutional, political, and technological processes.

This book provides an overview and the major findings of the project “Approaches for the Improvement of the Economic Sustainability of Natural Forest Management in the Tropics”. The project was jointly conducted by the Thünen Institute for World Forestry and the University of Hamburg between 2011 and 2013. Additionally, it presents the results from the pilot studies conducted in 2009/2010 by the institutes in South East Asia. In the course of developing new financial incentives to curb emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in international climate negotiations since 2005, REDD + has emerged as a promising mechanism which includes conservation and sustainable management of forests. As the overarching goal of the project is closely linked with the mechanism, this report also includes relevant outcomes of REDD+ project implemented by the Institute for World Forestry and the University of Hamburg in Madagascar and Nicaragua.

Contact:

Institute for World Forestry
University of Hamburg
Centre of Wood Science World Forestry
Leuschnerstraße 91
21031 Hamburg Germany
Telephone:+49 40/739 62-101
Fax:    +49 40/739 62-199
E-mail:    weltforst@uni-hamburg.de
Web:    http://www.worldforestry.de
 
Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute
Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries
Bundesallee 50
38116 Braunschweig Germany
Web:   https://www.ti.bund.de/

Contents

Acronymes and abbreviations    XXXI
Terms and definitions used    XXXVI
Tables    XXXVII
Figures    XXXIX
Box ....... XLII
Annex ... XLII
1    Background    1
1.1    Initial position    1
1.2    Structure of the book    3
1.3    Problem statement    4
1.4    Objectives    8
1.5    Guiding themes    9
1.6    Approaches    10
1.7    Collaboration and partners    11
2    Theoretical framework    15
2.1    Tropical forest- major features    15
2.2    Sustainable forest management    17
2.2.1    300 years of sustainable forest management- from sustainable wood production to global multiple functionality    17
2.2.2    Sustainable forest management in tropical natural forests development of silvicultural systems    19
2.2.3    Sustainable forest management- status today    21
2.2.4    Sustainable forest management- socio-economic aspects .23
2.2.5    Sustainable forest management and the Rio Conventions ..24
2.3    REDD+: a new mechanism to maintain tropical forests    25
2.4    EU FLEGT action plan: an approach to combat illegal logging    28
 
3    Methods    33
3.1    Introduction    33
3.2    Study sites    35
3.3    Description of study sites    35
3.3.1    Vietnam    35
3.3.2    Nepal    40
3.3.3    Suriname    43
3.3.4    Ghana    47
3.3.5    Madagascar    52
3.3.6    Nicaragua    55
3.4    Schematic diagram of the research components    61
3.4.1    Schematic diagram of the research studies in Vietnam    62
3.4.2    Schematic diagram of the research studies in Nepal    64
3.4.3    Schematic diagram of the research studies in Suriname    66
3.5    Coordination matrix    68

4    Enduring multi-functional management in modified and semi-natural forests, predominantly for subsistence purposes (managed by individual households)    73
4.1    Introduction    73
4.2    Forest resource assessment of Dinh Hoa District    74
4.3    Linkage between the government policy and land use changes in Dinh Hoa    83
4.4    Subsistence economy at the forest margin– an indispensable livelihood strategy    92
4.5    Criteria, indicators and verifiers for assessing sustainable forest management    96
4.6    Minimum compensation demanded for the natural forest conservation in Vietnam    101
4.7    Could forest management certification be an incentive to support SFM?    107

5    Enduring multi-functional management in modified and semi-natural forests, predominantly for subsistence purposes (community based forest management)    115
5.1    Introduction    115
5.2    Forest assessment in Chitwan District, Nepal    116
5.3    Forest increment – a comparative study of commercially important tree species in Nepal    124
5.4    Community forestry- enhanced sustainability through involvement of local stakeholders    130
5.5    Opportunity costs of natural forest management    135
5.6    Benefit-cost analysis of community forest management in Nepal    138
5.7    Developing C&I and verifiers for a sustainable community based forest management    142
5.8    Ecological and economic impacts of forest transformation    146
5.9    Economic analysis of community based forest management regimes under different silvicultural systems    149

6    Periodic (cyclic) forest utilization in large-scale contiguous primary and modified natural tropical forests    161
6.1    Background information on Suriname    161
6.2    Factors accounting for the regulation of allowable cuts    163
6.3    Age and growth of tropical trees and the productivity of tropical forests    181
6.4    Costs and efficiency in reduced impact logging (RIL)    188
6.4.1    Background and Problems    188
6.4.2    Concepts and methods    189
6.4.3    Results & Discussion    190
6.5    Potentials in the value chain for the improvement of SFM in the tropics    200
6.5.1    Challenges    200
6.5.2    Scope and objectives    201
6.5.3    State of the Surinamese timber industry    201
6.5.4    Value chain potentials for enhancing sustainability    209

7    Case study - Ghana    217
7.1    Introduction    217
7.2    Buffer zones contribute to the survival of tropical forests    217

8    Case study - Madagascar    223
8.1    Introduction    223
8.2    Project REDD-FORECA    223
8.3    Efficient methods for the quantitative determination of deforestation and forest degradation and its dynamics    225
8.4    Assessment scheme for human impact on forest under REDD+    227
8.5    Sustainable Land Management in Madagascar (SuLaMa)    234

9    Case study - Nicaragua    241
9.1    Introduction    241
9.2    The development and implementation of locally adapted incentive schemes    242
9.3    Risk-zone modeling of forest degradation– an option for early action under the REDD+ mechanism    249
9.4    Quantifying forest fragmentation – using rapid appraisal methods on the national scale    251

10    Summary of the main findings    255
Developing C&I and verifiers for a sustainable forest management    257
Small-scale multi-resource forest inventories    258
Qualitative research (Participatory Rural Appraisal) coupled with remote sensing, geographic information system for historical forest cover analysis    258
Assessing forest dependancy on and willingness to accept compensation payment for the protection of allocated natural forest of local communtiies    259
Forest transformation and its’ economic and ecological consequences    260
Forest increment- a comparative study of commercially important tree species    260
Economic analysis of community based forest management regimes under different silvicultural systems    261
Benefit-cost analysis of community forest management    262
Factors accounting for the regulation of allowable cuts    263
Cost and efficiency in reduced impact logging (RIL)    264
Potential in the value chain for the improvement of
sustainable forest management in the tropics    264

11    Adoption and expansion of the findings by national/local stakeholders in the countries    267

12    Further research    269

References    271

Zusatzinformation

Gewicht 0.5
Lieferzeit 2-3 Tage